10 Worst Politically Incorrect Moments In James Bond History

10. Sexism in The Spy Who Loved Me (1962 Novel)

This novel was decidedly more sexist and racist than other Fleming outings. The Spy Who Loved Me was the ninth novel in Ian Fleming’s James Bond series, released in 1962. It was the shortest and most sexually explicit of Fleming’s novel, and it was also an experiment in that the story was told in first-person by a young woman, Vivienne Michel, for the first time. Bond didn’t make an appearance until two-thirds of the way through the novel.
10. Sexism in The Spy Who Loved Me (1962 Novel)

9. Violence Against Women in From Russia with Love (1963 Film)

From Russia with Love was the second James Bond film, following the success of Dr. No. It is considered more complex than its predecessor, but not as good as its successor, Goldfinger (whom many believe to be the best Bond film). From Russia with Love displays an acceptable film-version of the sexism and chauvinistic attitude displayed in the first book on this list.
9. Violence Against Women in From Russia with Love (1963 Film)

8. JW Pepper in The Man with the Golden Gun (1974 Film)

The Man with the Golden Gun was the ninth James Bond film, and the second to star Roger Moore as the MI6 agent. It’s a loose adaptation of Ian Fleming’s novel of the same name, and revolves around Bond finding the Solex Agitator, a device that can harness the power of the sun. The film was set in the face of the 1973 energy crisis, and reflected the popular martial arts craze of the time, with several kung-fu scenes.
8. JW Pepper in The Man with the Golden Gun (1974 Film)

7. Racism in For Your Eyes Only (1960 Short Story Collection)

For Your Eyes Only was the first short story collection by Ian Fleming, released in 1960. It contained five stories, “From a View to a Kill,” “For Your Eyes Only,” “Quantum of Solace,” Risico,” and “The Hildebrand Rarity.” The collection was a good example of showing the imperial attitude that Fleming grew up with during his life in the early 20th century, and many of the characters reflect this attitude with overt racism and a sense of superiority over “non-pure” peoples.
7. Racism in For Your Eyes Only (1960 Short Story Collection)

6. Racism in Octopussy (1983 Film)

Octopussy was the 13th James Bond film, the sixth to star Roger Moore, and the film with the crudest name in the series. The name was taken from Fleming’s 1966 short story collection, Octopussy and The Living Daylights, and it displayed some of the film’s more racist interactions and subtleties.
6. Racism in Octopussy (1983 Film)

5. “Master and Servant” in Dr. No (1962 Film)

Dr. No was the first James Bond film, which starred Sean Connery and started Bondmania. It had the lowest budget of $1 million, but was a commercial success. It was based on the 1958 Ian Fleming novel of the same name. In the film, Bond is sent to Jamaica to investigate the disappearance of a fellow British agent. I’m sure you can see where this is going.
5. “Master and Servant” in Dr. No (1962 Film)

4. “Yellowface” in You Only Live Twice (1967 Film)

You Only Live Twice was the fifth James Bond film, and the fifth to star Sean Connery. The screenplay was written by Roald Dahl, a friend (and accomplished author) of Ian Fleming, who wrote the book of the same name. This was the first film to discard most of Fleming’s plot. In the film, Bond is dispatched to Japan after American and Soviet-manned spacecraft mysteriously disappear in orbit.
4. “Yellowface” in You Only Live Twice (1967 Film)

3. Racism In Goldfinger (1959 Novel)

Goldfinger, the seventh novel in Fleming’s James Bond series, was published in 1959. The story centers on 007 investigating the gold-smuggling activities of Auric Goldfinger, who is suspected of also being connected to the Soviet counter-intelligence organization SMERSH. The novel went to the top of the best-sellers lists upon its release.
3. Racism In Goldfinger (1959 Novel)

2. Blaxploitation in Live and Let Die (1973 Film)

Live and Let Die, the eighth film in the James Bond series, has consistently been considered the most racially charged James Bond film. In it, 007 is sent to Harlem, where a drug lord known as Mr. Big plans to distribute two tons of heroin to put rival drug barons out of business. Mr. Big is discovered to be the alter ego of Dr. Kananga, a corrupt Caribbean dictator.
2. Blaxploitation in Live and Let Die (1973 Film)

1. Racism in Live and Let Die (1954 Novel)

For all of the racial stereotypes and craze-hopping of the film, the novel version of Live and Let Die was worse. It was the second novel in Fleming’s series, and the author wrote the novel in Jamaica. The novel had a similar storyline to the film, but with harsher ideas and crude remarks of blatant racism.
1. Racism in Live and Let Die (1954 Novel)